The Dopefly Tech Blog

<< The Dopefly Tech Blog Main page

An Agile year

posted under category: Software Quality on December 21, 2012 at 4:36 pm by MrNate

This year (2012, for posterity sake) my project at work took on an Agile methodology. Why? 2011 was a productive year, we made a lot of people happy with our software, but we had about three giant software releases for the whole year. These changes being so far between meant I could never know if what I was doing was going to work for everyone, and it also meant that, while the software was better tested, when there were bugs, they would have to work around them for months until we had the fix out.

Accelerating our release cycle to every two weeks meant that even if something was broken, it wouldn't stay broken for long. It also meant we had to be on top of our tasks a lot more, with a stronger focus on what we are doing today and what we will be doing tomorrow.

How did we do it? We initially decided on twice-weekly scrum meetings, just to say what we did and what we were doing next. This wasn't enough for the project manager, so we bumped it up to 4 times per week (the 5th day we had a regularly scheduled customer meeting). We began the year by listing all of our customers and all of their existing and upcoming tasks, including our own nit-list (like upgrade the database version, wash the dishes, support the new manufacturing system, etc). This is our backlog. We worked with our customers to set a priority on each item, then planned a sprint strategy, taking tasks with the highest priority and mixing them with the most pressing deadlines. Throughout the year we tracked new business and requests into an issues log, promoted items from our backlog into workable sprint items, and we got a lot of things done that way.

We did learn some lessons though. First, daily scrum meetings are great, but when our customer gets involved (and he loves to be involved), he tends to ask questions mid-update, slowing the scrum to a crawl, turning what should be a 5 minute meeting into a 45 minute meeting. We should really cut that out. Also we have the need for a system that will take a customer feedback and track it through an official change request to a prioritized backlog item, to an in-work task, to a bullet point on our release notes. There are things that almost do this, but usually require something custom for the customer feedback part at the very least, and so few of them have been 'blessed' for use within my company. Also we have some release systems that do not play well with Agile. One system that notifies the help desk about outages and work in the area takes an hour to fill out each time we do a production release. Another system we may be forced to use requires a gated software version validation process that will take a day's worth of paperwork for each release.

The worst downside though is that it sucks my energy. I have to be on task a lot more, which has meant less blogging and less tweeting. That's sad for me.

In summary, twenty-five software releases on our two-week sprint cycle, less stress on the development, more pressure on the project manager, and happier customers. All-in-all, it has been a successful experiment that I think we will continue with.


No Comments Posted Yet! - Post A Comment!